Canine Sales for Jersey City, NJ

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Mike Watkins proudly serves customers in Jersey City, NJ with Canine Sales . We Specialize in Police K9's, Detection K9's, Personal Protection, Basic Obedience and Problem Solving.

  • We Provide Police, Detection, and Military K9’s
  • We provide, Family Protection and Executive Protection
  • We provide Personal Protection, Shutzhund Titled, Obedience Trained K9’s and Puppies
  • We sell only top quality and proven Equipment
  • We have tailor made programs and training to fit all your needs
  • We import Top Quality working dogs and pups from Europe
  • We deal honestly, ethically, and professionally

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Jersey City, NJ Canine Sales Areas

About Jersey City

Jersey City is the second-most-populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey, after Newark.[27] It is the seat of Hudson County as well as the county's largest city.[28] As of 2017, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program calculated that Jersey City's population was 270,753,[21] with the largest population increase of any municipality in New Jersey since 2010,[29] an increase of about 9.4% from the 2010 United States Census, when the city's population was at 247,597,[20][30] ranking the city the 75th-largest in the nation.[31]

Part of the New York metropolitan area, Jersey City is bounded on the east by the Hudson River and Upper New York Bay and on the west by the Hackensack River and Newark Bay. A port of entry, with 30.7 miles (49.4km) of waterfront[32] and extensive rail infrastructure and connectivity, the city is an important transportation terminus and distribution and manufacturing center for the Port of New York and New Jersey. Jersey City shares significant mass transit connections with Manhattan.[33][34] Redevelopment of the Jersey City waterfront has made the city one of the largest centers of banking and finance in the United States and has led to the district being nicknamed Wall Street West.[35]

After a peak population of 316,715 measured in the 1930 Census, the city's population saw a half-century-long decline to a low of 223,532 in the 1980 Census. Since then, the city's population has grown, with the 2010 population reflecting an increase of 7,542 (+3.1%) from the 240,055 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 11,518 (+5.0%) from the 228,537 counted in the 1990 Census.[36][37]

The land comprising what is now Jersey City was inhabited by the Lenape, a collection of tribes (later called Delaware Indian). In 1609, Henry Hudson, seeking an alternate route to East Asia, anchored his small vessel Halve Maen (English: Half Moon) at Sandy Hook, Harsimus Cove and Weehawken Cove, and elsewhere along what was later named the North River. After spending nine days surveying the area and meeting its inhabitants, he sailed as far north as Albany. By 1621, the Dutch West India Company was organized to manage this new territory and in June 1623, New Netherland became a Dutch province, with headquarters in New Amsterdam. Michael Reyniersz Pauw received a land grant as patroon on the condition that he would establish a settlement of not fewer than fifty persons within four years. He chose the west bank of the North River (Hudson River) and purchased the land from the Lenape. This grant is dated November 22, 1630 and is the earliest known conveyance for what are now Hoboken and Jersey City. Pauw, however, was an absentee landlord who neglected to populate the area and was obliged to sell his holdings back to the Company in 1633.[38] That year, a house was built at Communipaw for Jan Evertsen Bout, superintendent of the colony, which had been named Pavonia (the Latinized form of Pauw's name, which means "peacock").[39] Shortly after, another house was built at Harsimus Cove and became the home of Cornelius Van Vorst, who had succeeded Bout as superintendent, and whose family would become influential in the development of the city. Relations with the Lenape deteriorated, in part because of the colonialist's mismanagement and misunderstanding of the indigenous people, and led to series of raids and reprisals and the virtual destruction of the settlement on the west bank. During Kieft's War, approximately eighty Lenapes were killed by the Dutch in a massacre at Pavonia on the night of February 25, 1643.[40]
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